Arabian VGnome Results

The Arabian Inheritance

The Arabian is the oldest recorded horse breed, stretching back 2,000 years.

It’s dish-shaped nose, large eyes, arched neck, and high tail carriage shows off the breed’s beauty, making it one of the most recognizable breeds of horse in the world, valued as a cultural symbol, a source of wealth, or military companion.

Renowned for their tolerance to heat and graceful athleticism, the Arabian is an endurance athlete without peer.

Arabian Color

Here’s a quick summary

An introduction to Arabian color

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Since genetic conditions in Arabian horses often reveal themselves only when two copies of the diseased gene are inherited by a foal, a stallion that is a carrier of an inherited condition can quickly spread the diseased variant across the world.

Much the same as if a population of horses derives from a small herd of breeding stock, and one or more of them is a carrier of a genetic disease, then that diseased gene copy is likely to spread throughout the growing population quickly.

With a good understanding of the genetic risks involved, breeders can gradually reduce the number of carriers over several generations, while still maintaining genetic diversity, and desirable traits in bloodlines.

R

This horse's base color

Chestnut

R

Does this horse carry the grey variant?

Yes

p

Are there any variants influencing white patterns?

No

Inherited Genetic Disease Risk

Here’s a quick summary

h
R

Occipitoatlantoaxial Malformation

The HODX3 Gene
Clear

p

Cerebellar Abiotrophy

The TOE1 Gene
Carrier

R

Lavendaer Foal Syndrome

The MYO5A Gene
Clear

R

Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease

The PRKDC Gene
Clear

REMEMBER

Genes are not the only determinant of performance The environment in which a horse is raised and managed plays a critical role in racing performance. There is a strong interaction between genetic inheritance and training: they are complementary.

Inherited Genetic Disease Risk

We use two terms that might be unfamiliar: mutation and carrier.

Every horse has two copies of each gene: one gene from each parent.

A gene mutation is a change in the DNA sequence of a gene. This change influences how the gene works. This gene mutation change could be benign and have no effect on gene function.  Or it could be harmful and cause disease.

A carrier is a horse with a gene mutation inherited from one parent. This mutation is in the cells of their body, but it’s just there, not causing any problems.

Arabian Genetic Conditions

Since genetic conditions in Arabian horses often reveal themselves only when two copies of the diseased gene are inherited by a foal, a stallion that is a carrier of an inherited condition can quickly spread the diseased variant across the world.

Much the same as if a population of horses derives from a small herd of breeding stock, and one or more of them is a carrier of a genetic disease, then that diseased gene copy is likely to spread throughout the growing population quickly.

With a good understanding of the genetic risks involved, breeders can gradually reduce the number of carriers over several generations, while still maintaining genetic diversity, and desirable traits in bloodlines.

Not knowing which horses carry these genes increases the risk of breeding horses that can produce an incurable, diseased foal. Conversely, knowing that your horse is free of these specific disease genes means it can be bred to any horse without risk that these diseases manifest in the foal.

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QUESTIONS?

It’s normal to feel concerned about your horse.

Reach out to us for a personal consultation, and we’ll walk you through your results or advise on the best breeding decisions.

You can also contact us if you have an inherited disease running through a pedigree. We’ll do our best to figure it out, then advise you on best breeding practice.

Should you think your horse already has one of these serious diseases then we encourage you to speak to your veterinarian for the best clinical advice.

Should we discover something new, then we’ll let you know, with no need for any additional tests or samples to be mailed in. We already have everything we need to look out for the DNA of your horse for their entire lifetime. No more tests or samples are needed.

This report is based on the latest genomic sequencing technology and scientific research that is regularly reviewed by the Victory Genomics Expert Team.

In the future, newly discovered genetic mutations could also cause similar diseases in this report. We’re working hard to find out.

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info@victorygenomics.com